Health

Stay Sober After Alcohol Treatment

Moving from a supportive environment to everyday life can be difficult. Coming out of rehab, you may find yourself in trigger situations that spark the idea of ​​going back to old habits. Going back to your old neighborhood, friends, or family, and certain emotions can tempt you to go back to using or drinking.

You can help yourself to manage and avoid temptations in your daily life after rehab, such as:

  • Surround yourself with sober people who care about you and want to help you succeed. Find a support group in your area or even a person you can call when you feel tempted. Just look for a strong support system.
  • If, after rehab, you are returning home, ask a loved one or someone you trust to remove any paraphernalia from your house. Avoid places and people that spark feelings of interest in using.
  • Set goals for the future. Your life depends on you only. Being active will help you manage temptations when they arise. It will be much easier to stay on track when you sense why you want to stay sober and all the benefits it will bring to your life.
  • It is crucial to follow-up appointments with your rehabilitation center or a doctor. Stick to these appointments. You may feel tempted to skip them or think you can handle them alone. However, it’s much easier to avoid or manage temptations when receiving support from health professionals.
  • Be grateful when we have a strong appreciation for life and everything we’ve been given. Consider starting a gratitude journal and writing down five daily things that make you feel fulfilled and happy. Life will be easier and more joyful.
  • Create new, healthy habits to replace old ones. Find a positive habit you enjoy doing and stick with it . Go back to school if you haven’t finish college. Take a course on programing, writing, or learn a new language. A study published in the European Journal of Social Psychology shows that it takes more than two months before a new practice becomes automatic.

The Environment Impacts Your Recovery

It’s no secret that the environment you surround yourself with can significantly impact your overall health and well-being. This is also true when it comes to addiction and recovery. The people, places, and things you associate with can either help or hinder your efforts to stay sober. Here are six of the most significant environmental factors to consider:

1. Rehab: If you’ve been to rehab, transitioning back to life outside of treatment can be tricky. It’s important to surround yourself with people who support your sobriety and avoid places and situations that might trigger a relapse.

2. Treatment: Even if you haven’t been to rehab, ongoing treatment is essential for maintaining sobriety. Surround yourself with people who understand what you’re going through and can offer support and encouragement.

3. Family problems: Many people struggling with addiction also have family members who abuse drugs or alcohol. If this is the case, it’s important to distance yourself from those toxic relationships and create a support network of sober family and friends.

4. Your future: One of the best motivations for staying sober is thinking about your future goals and dreams. According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, “People in recovery often find it helpful to remind themselves of their reasons for remaining abstinent whenever they are faced with a high-risk situation for relapse.”5 So whether you want to get married, have kids, go back to school or start your own business, keep those goals in mind when temptation strikes.

5. The Gain: In early recovery, it’s common to focus on what you’ve lost—such as your job, friends, or family member’s support—rather than what you stand to gain by staying sober. However, once you start rebuilding your life in recovery, you may be surprised by how much you have to gain—a new sense of purpose, healthier relationships, and a brighter future.6

6. Your environment: The last environmental factor to consider is your physical surroundings. Creating a safe, sober space for yourself is an essential part of recovery—and it may mean moving out of your current home or getting rid of certain belongings that hold negative associations. It may be time for a change if your home is full of reminders of your drinking or drug use (for example, empty alcohol bottles or drug paraphernalia).

While many environmental factors can impact addiction and recovery, remember that you are not powerless against them—you can control how they affect you by making positive daily choices. If you need help making those choices or creating a supportive environment for yourself, don’t hesitate to reach out for help from a professional treatment program or counselor specializing in addiction recovery.

Staying sober requires effort and commitment. You may have family and friends that care for you, but your rehab is a job that only competes on you. After completing alcohol rehab in NYC, you need to provide for yourself. You should continue attending your medical appointments. The damage to your brain and other organs requires time to recover fully.

Although after recovery, you should make sobriety your lifestyle. Taking care of your body, mind, and spirit will give you the happiness that sleeps inside you.

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