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Why Is My Cat Spraying Indoors and What Should I Do Now?

Last Updated on August 13, 2023 by

We agree it can be tough to break that habit of your cat, but don’t fret; there are some ways to get your cat out of that pesky habit.

It can be hard for cat owners to forget that distinct cat urine smell and even harder to clean up the mess made by their four paws inside the house. If you have witnessed such a thing in your home, then know that feline pets spray to mark their territories and leave behind a repelling odor.

It is best to meet the vet for medical assistance in repeated spraying cases. Spraying can be due to physical issues as much as it can be due to behavioral problems. If it is because of an underlying health problem, then timely testing and treatments will be necessary to ensure its wellbeing.

Cat insurance in NZ helps tackle unexpected vet bills without you having to take on much financial stress. Contemplate buying kitten insurance so providing quality medical care need not be a significant financial challenge during testing times of health.

Meanwhile, read this article to learn why cats spray indoors and what you should do in such a case.

Why and what to do?

Spraying is one way cats communicate with other feline fur babies to let them know about their claims to a place, warn intruders, and express their sexual availability, stress, and anxiety. Don’t be surprised if your furry pet pees on your drapes, walls, and furniture, as it can happen almost anywhere.

A cat sprays urine so that when other cats smell it they know that another cat has already claimed that territory, and trespassing can be an open invitation for a fierce fight. Often a cat sprays to signal to other felines; however, the signals are meant for its human when it does the same while frustrated or stressed.

Also, the spraying location tells a lot about your cat’s intentions. For instance, spraying on doors and windows may mean other animals in the house are barred from using them, and spraying on your bed, clothes, and other comfort items may mean that your munchkin is pretty annoyed with you for something.

Look back to the recent past to learn the reasons for this misbehavior. Did you hand-feed your cat lately or not? Didn’t you take it out for a walk or travel places with it? Did you spend quality time with your fur baby in the past few days? These are a few questions you can answer, to begin with.

Unspayed and non-neutered cats in heat will often exhibit such behaviors. Consider fixing your furball, as it can be an effective and safe solution. Talk to your vet about sterilizing your cat to curb the spraying habit and its aggression. Typically, the spraying habit will fade after about two weeks of surgery. 

However, if your cat is already fixed and there is still a problem, cut access to places your cat has been marking all the time. Consider having your cat inside a fenced indoor area, declutter your home, set up motion sensors, install shades, and room dividers, use odor neutralizers and elbow grease on marked places, and more.

When everything else fails, spraying could be due to a deeper health issue that must be treated. Schedule a vet’s appointment for a quick health checkup. At the same time, consider being prepared with cat insurance NZ so that dealing with unplanned vet treatment costs need not be financially burdening. Contemplate purchasing kitten insurance because every furball deserves access to quality medical care during dire health scenarios.

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